Climate Stripes: Digital Artworks

The University Art Collection has accessioned two editions of Climate Stripes developed by Professor Ed Hawkins (National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading) into the collection as digitally produced artworks: Climate Stripes: Warming Stripes, Hay on Wye 2017 and Climate Stripes: Warming Stripes, Global 2020.

This simple pattern of coloured stripes is generated by the latest scientific data on climate change and represents the increase in temperatures since 1850, one stripe per year, with dark blues used for colder years, and dark reds for warmer years.

The stripes are now a global phenomenon, repurposed for everything from news bulletins, art installations and rock concerts, to adorning electric cars. As part of the University Art Collection, Climate Stripes will be preserved as a key moment in the University’s visual and institutional history. It also connects to the spirit of openness that lies behind the stripes, which have been made available for everybody to share, copy, remix, transform, and build upon for any purpose. By recognising them as artworks, we aim to extend their impact among new audiences and open more conversations about how human activities are fundamentally changing the weather and climate.

Start exploring now

Climate Stripes: Digital Artworks

Global climate stripes. Vertical stripes in various shades of blue, peach and red with each stripe representing a year from 1850 to 2020. Blue stripes indicate colder years and red stripes indicate warmer years. The right side of the artwork (towards the present day) is predominantly red.

The University Art Collection has accessioned two editions of Climate Stripes developed by Professor Ed Hawkins (National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading) into the collection as digitally produced artworks: Climate Stripes: Warming Stripes, Hay on Wye 2017 and Climate Stripes: Warming Stripes, Global 2020. This simple pattern of coloured stripes is generated by the […]

John Golding

Closeup of L.1 (Mirage) by John Golding. Abstract painting in shades of yellow and blue.

A combination of artist and art historian, John Golding (1929-2012) was born in Hastings, Kent, and grew up in Mexico. Early in his career, he was influenced by the dark, painterly figurative works of Mexican muralists like José Clemente Orozco (1883- 1949). Golding’s parents sent him to Ridley College, Ontario, at 13. He began painting […]

Max Weber: The American Cubist

Landscape view of New York from above in the cubist style in blues and greys.

Best known as the artist who introduced Cubism to the USA, Max Weber discovered this style during his time in Europe. Influenced by artists including Rousseau, Matisse, and Cézanne, Weber’s artworks after this trip are those of a pioneering modernist. He had a huge impact on the American Modernist Movement, with its tendencies to abstract art.

Colour, Tone, Shadow, Line

Heron by Allen W. Seaby, 1908.

Allen W. Seaby and the Art of the Colour Print “The colour print may reveal the most beautiful and delicate form …” – Allen W. Seaby Colourful images built up from designs carved into blocks of wood was a method of printmaking mastered by ukiyo-e artists of the late Edo period in Japan. When such […]